Movie Review – Logan (No Spoilers)

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Movie Review – Logan (No Spoilers)

Pierce Buckley, Senior Staff Writer

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Logan is the most recent film released by 20th Century Fox that takes place in the X-men Cinematic Universe. It is directed by James Mangold who previously directed The Wolverine (2013). This film is most notably Hugh Jackman’s last time playing the role of Logan, a.k.a., The Wolverine.
Logan takes place in the new timeline created from the events of X-Men: Days of Future Past, in the year 2029, six years after the End of DOFP, where things have taken a dark turn for Logan. The X-Men have been disbanded, mutants have been seemingly wiped out, Logan’s healing factor is not working the same as it used to and he is now hiding along the Mexican border with his mentor, Charles Xavier (Professor X), played by Patrick Stewart, who is succumbing to old age and a variety of disorders. Logan has to work as a limo driver on the other side of the border in order to get money for medication to help Charles, and one day encounters a woman who asks him to take a young mutant girl, Laura, played by newcomer actress Dafne Keen, to the Canadian border where she will be safe from the corporation that held her, Alkali Transigen, led by the films main antagonist, Donald Pierce, played by Boyd Holbrook, along with Richard E. Grant’s character. On the way, Logan starts to learn more about what, and more importantly, who, Laura is, and must face the challenges presented by the road ahead in order to protect the future of mutant kind.
Coming into this movie opening day on Friday March 3rd, I was pumped to see it. I was looking for a Wolverine film that had a great story, a well-rounded cast, action, everything one could hope for from a film like this and coming out of the theater, I was not disappointed in the slightest. Logan is easily one of, if not the best film, in the X-Men franchise. It had everything I was hoping for. The film was centered around a solid plot, the cast had great chemistry, the action was top-notch, and of course, Hugh Jackman knocked it out of the park as Wolverine. There were even parts of the film that pulled at my emotions, making the film even stronger.
After 17 years, we finally got the story driven, emotion pulling and brutally action-packed Wolverine film fans have been waiting for. This is boosted greatly by the fact that Logan is the second movie in the X-Men universe to have an R-rating, a trend that I hope to see with other movies in the future.  With this rating, the film can break the limits of the typical PG-13 rating, which for both Logan and 2016’s Deadpool, allows the audience to see the true comic book representations of the title characters and what they are capable of on screen, which is why both films are better off as R-rated. This R-rating is very evident within the first four minutes of the film. I won’t say what it is, but it involves blood, gore and most certainly Logan ‘cutting’ loose.
​Not only does Hugh Jackman give an excellent performance, but so does the rest of the cast. Patrick Stewart is outstanding once more as Professor Xavier, this time as an older and more fragile version of his character. Boyd Holbrook in the role of Donald Pierce is a compelling villain and proves to be quite a large obstacle in Logan’s path throughout the film. Another notable performance is that of newcomer actress Dafne Keen as Laura, who does a great job of bringing her comic book character to life on the big screen. She has a bright future ahead of her and I hope to see her return as Laura in the years to come.
​In the end, Logan is an amazing movie that is executed beautifully and is truly a welcome addition to Fox’s X-Men franchise. Hugh Jackman’s last performance as Wolverine is his best yet and makes this movie a must watch. Everything from the cast to the plot makes this movie one to remember and is a must-see in theaters and is definitely worth buying on Blu-ray.

Final Score:
95/100